Did anybody try or got new iPad Air?

I’m just curious, I’m on ageing iPad pro 10’5 and I cannot use many synths( and fx) I would like to unless I’m bouncing it into audio (you know those synths like model 15/D)
Now I’m pretty sure ns2 like others use only one core ( correct me if I’m wrong but so far that’s what I have been reading all over the net) so I wouldn’t go for current pro as that’s just silly when we get A14 in air. So only concern (performance wise) is Ram and that air is same as my pro, that is 4Gb (I bet air got faster one) so I should be ok unless new system going to eat up more ram in future.
Basically I just want to see/hear from somebody what it can handle so I could reproduce same thing on my iPad and see how much cpu difference I could expect. Anyway I guess any increase would be good so I should just shut up and get one:DDD

And btw, what is your thoughts on new Mac line with M1? NS2 on laptop/Desktop anyone? Technology wise I think it might be great shift but there is one obvious problem especially for pro users, Max 16Gb ram

Hope you all having great time and are not distracted by all this mess what has been happening out there;)

Comments

  • I was actually thinking of popping for a new iPad Pro 11 inch thinking there would be a huge performance increase in daws. Now you have me wondering. So if an app only utilizes one core that would not translate into lots more auv3s or lower latency settings? Or the ability to run more iaa apps without choking? Can anyone explain what all that processing power does for existing music apps? In particular ns2.

  • Hmm this is an interesting thing to think about. Anyone with the knowledge care to chime in here?

  • Single core benchmarks for iPads. I’m not entirely sure which generation the new ones are in but if you know the name of the processor, you can probably get a close enough idea of the power in comparison to your old device.

    https://browser.geekbench.com/ios_devices/11

  • Thanks @Stiksi . That link clarifies a lot. I can see why @Cray23 came to like the new iPad Air over the pro. That’s where I am leaning now also. So that leaves the questions around why apps like ns2 can only use one core? If a device has 4 cores and ns2 is running on one of them, then I launch another app, say AUM, would iOS automatically run that on another core or might it run on the same core as ns2 and slow it down? And what happens if you launch ns2 from within aum? I.e is core utilization load balanced by the os? And is it done at the app level or the task level within an app? I realize these are pretty technical questions but any info you can point me to would be much appreciated.

  • Whoa, those benchmarks piss me off a little. I just bought the latest and greatest iPad pro.. and within 2 months it's already outbenchmarked. Yikes. WTF Apple

  • edited November 15

    @boomer said:
    Thanks @Stiksi . That link clarifies a lot. I can see why @Cray23 came to like the new iPad Air over the pro. That’s where I am leaning now also. So that leaves the questions around why apps like ns2 can only use one core? If a device has 4 cores and ns2 is running on one of them, then I launch another app, say AUM, would iOS automatically run that on another core or might it run on the same core as ns2 and slow it down? And what happens if you launch ns2 from within aum? I.e is core utilization load balanced by the os? And is it done at the app level or the task level within an app? I realize these are pretty technical questions but any info you can point me to would be much appreciated.

    iOS doesn't provide any way for an app to choose which cores or how many cores are used. It's all managed by iOS, and is subject to Apple's decisions at any given time to performance with battery use and heat management.

    The very latest version of iOS introduces the possibility for apps to use more than one thread for audio processing but only if older apps are heavily modified to implement it. Not all apps would even benefit from that. And, even if they use multiple threads, they still don't have the ability to select which cores those threads get allocated to.

  • Thanks @number37 . So now we are getting to heart of the question of whether more cores equals better performance for audio apps. I know that a thread cant be split between cores. If we start with the assumption that ios is going to allocate threads to cores efficiently, it would generally mean that an app dividing its tasks into more threads translates to better performance. But there is the problem of not knowing which thread will finish first. And for any task where timing is critical, like audio, I assume that’s why you say not all apps would benefit - audio needs to run In a single thread? Am I getting this right? If so then my next question is does ios itself only allow one audio thread for the whole device? If different audio apps can run on their own thread, then it seems what multiple cores would provide is the ability to run more apps without impacting each other’s performance, but not necessarily help the performance of any one app. Whereas a faster processor but fewer cores would improve the performance of any one app if there are fewer apps running. Am I oversimplifying?

  • I’m not a developer. Be aware that surely much of what follows is poorly explained at best, and completely wrong at worst.

    So now we are getting to heart of the question of whether more cores equals better performance for audio apps. I know that a thread cant be split between cores.

    I’m not sure that’s correct. I’m not sure it’s incorrect either. I do know that the developer has no control whatsoever over which cores tasks are assigned to. The operating system does that.

    If we start with the assumption that ios is going to allocate threads to cores efficiently, it would generally mean that an app dividing its tasks into more threads translates to better performance.

    Not a good assumption. The priority is on battery life and heat management, not performance.

    But there is the problem of not knowing which thread will finish first.

    Yes, and there’s a certain amount of overhead involved in coordinating all that.

    And for any task where timing is critical, like audio, I assume that’s why you say not all apps would benefit - audio needs to run In a single thread?

    Currently audio needs to run in a single real-time-safe thread per app. IOS 14 introduces some multi-threading mechanism that I don’t claim to understand. I’ll get into the weeds if I try to explain what I think are the types of apps that can benefit or not. I’m not a developer, so I’d just be pulling thoughts out of my butt.

    Am I getting this right? If so then my next question is does ios itself only allow one audio thread for the whole device?

    No. One audio thread per app. Each app executes independently of all others. A host passes audio off to apps and/or receives audio from them in chunks. The app needs to do all it’s work in its own audio thread within those handoff windows or there are dropouts.

    If different audio apps can run on their own thread

    That’s not accurate. They are independent programs A host doesn’t run an app in a thread. It instantiates the program (which runs separately in its own process) and the two communicate through inter-process communication.

    (MacOS is a bit different in that AUv3 apps can be made to run in the host process.)

    then it seems what multiple cores would provide is the ability to run more apps without impacting each other’s performance, but not necessarily help the performance of any one app.

    I can’t say. I don’t understand it well enough. What I do know is programmers have no control over core allocation. Thread management does not equal core management.

    Whereas a faster processor but fewer cores would improve the performance of any one app if there are fewer apps running.

    I have no idea.

    Am I oversimplifying?

    I can pretty much guarantee that. ;)

    It’s kind of fun pretending like I understand more of this than I do. But I think I’ll step aside now.

  • LOL! Yeah - what was I thinking? =) But I think those last 2 statements I made that neither of us knows the answer to would go a long way toward a decision between a ipad pro vs new iPad Air. More cores but slower processor vs less cores and faster processor? Better yet, just tell me which one to get if all I want it for is music =)

  • I’m pretty sure single core performance and RAM amount are the number one considerations.

  • @Stiksi thanks. I should have just asked that simple question in the first place =) new iPad Air 256 is now on my Christmas list! Anybody wanna give me one? ;) :) =) B)

  • So the newest ipad air has really high single core bench marks but only 4 gb of ram compared to the latest ipad pro which has something like 3/4 of the processing but 2 gb more ram.

    Isn’t the processor far more important when using mainly auv3 plugins when you want to use as many as you can without crackling?

    Is ram less important if you aren’t using a lot of samples?

    Im just curious because the ipad pro i have now has 4gb or ram also but only 800 on the single core processor benchmark

    I bet the ipad pro next year will have at least the a14 chip but who knows what month that will be released?

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